Tag Archive for Reading

The Set Text by Tom Gauld

The Set Text by Tom Gauld

Article: Readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper, study finds

Readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper, study finds

A new study which found that readers using a Kindle were “significantly” worse than paperback readers at recalling when events occurred in a mystery story is part of major new Europe-wide research looking at the impact of digitisation on the reading experience.

Article: The Pleasure of Reading to Impress Yourself

The Pleasure of Reading to Impress Yourself

But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation.

Article: Why Readers, Scientifically, Are The Best People To Fall In Love With

Why Readers, Scientifically, Are The Best People To Fall In Love With

Finding someone who reads is like dating a thousand souls. It’s gaining the experience they’ve gained from everything they’ve ever read and the wisdom that comes with those experiences. It’s like dating a professor, a romantic and an explorer.

Article: Readers’ Night Out

Readers’ Night Out

This was New York’s third monthly silent-reading party. … Partiers bring whatever books they like, stay as long as they want, and aren’t allowed to speak to the other people in the room.

(From The New Yorker Page-Turner Blog, May 24, 2014)

Article: The Not So Horrible Consequences of Reading Banned Books

The Not So Horrible Consequences of Reading Banned Books

A new study of Texas teens found no connection between reading edgy books and mental health issues or delinquent behavior.

From The Catcher in the Rye to The Color Purple, countless books have been banned from school libraries over the years, usually because parents or administrators fear they somehow could be harmful to kids. Well, new research suggests these volumes may indeed have an impact on young, malleable minds.

A positive impact.

(From Pacific Standard, April 10, 2014)

Article: There’s no jot of shame in leaving the books on your shelf unread

There’s no jot of shame in leaving the books on your shelf unread

“A survey has found that half of an average home’s 138 books go unread. I’m surprised it is as low as a half. Books aren’t meant to be read “

(From The Telegraph, March 6, 2014)

Article: Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

“The benefits of reading literary fiction are many, ranging from making us more comfortable with ambiguity to honing our ability to pick up on the emotional states of others. Newly published research adds yet another positive outcome to that list: It can make us at least a little less racist.”

(From Pacific Standard, March 10, 2014)

Link: Which Country Reads the Most?

Which Country Reads the Most?

Here’s a clue, it’s in Asia…

Book Pet Peeves

In the article I posted yesterday, about negative reviews, Francine Prose wrote about some of the things she dislikes seeing when reading a new book. Some of her examples included lazy writing, like using old cliches or tired phrases. (“His eyes were as black as night.”)

It got me thinking about some of the things that make me cringe when I’m reading. I think I also dislike when a writer uses words or phrases that are predictable or just overused. For example, a writer describing a character as “devouring” books or other reading material. I’m sure whoever used it first was being creative, but now it’s just boring.

Do you have any pet peeves like this? Something that makes you stop when you’re reading, or makes you think less of the writing somehow.