Tag Archive for Study

Article: Readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper, study finds

Readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper, study finds

A new study which found that readers using a Kindle were “significantly” worse than paperback readers at recalling when events occurred in a mystery story is part of major new Europe-wide research looking at the impact of digitisation on the reading experience.

Article: Why Readers, Scientifically, Are The Best People To Fall In Love With

Why Readers, Scientifically, Are The Best People To Fall In Love With

Finding someone who reads is like dating a thousand souls. It’s gaining the experience they’ve gained from everything they’ve ever read and the wisdom that comes with those experiences. It’s like dating a professor, a romantic and an explorer.

Article: The Not So Horrible Consequences of Reading Banned Books

The Not So Horrible Consequences of Reading Banned Books

A new study of Texas teens found no connection between reading edgy books and mental health issues or delinquent behavior.

From The Catcher in the Rye to The Color Purple, countless books have been banned from school libraries over the years, usually because parents or administrators fear they somehow could be harmful to kids. Well, new research suggests these volumes may indeed have an impact on young, malleable minds.

A positive impact.

(From Pacific Standard, April 10, 2014)

Article: Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say

Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say

(From The Washington Post, April 6, 2014)

Article: Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

Study: Reading Literary Fiction Can Make You Less Racist

“The benefits of reading literary fiction are many, ranging from making us more comfortable with ambiguity to honing our ability to pick up on the emotional states of others. Newly published research adds yet another positive outcome to that list: It can make us at least a little less racist.”

(From Pacific Standard, March 10, 2014)

Link: Which Country Reads the Most?

Which Country Reads the Most?

Here’s a clue, it’s in Asia…

Article: Can Book Awards Poison Reader Reviews?

Can Book Awards Poison Reader Reviews?

(From Pacific Standard, February 19, 2014)

“Two business researchers, Balázs Kovács and Amanda J. Sharkey, at the Universities of Lugano and Chicago, respectively, analyzed thousands of reader reviews on Goodreads of 64 English-language books that either won or were short-listed for top book awards — including the National Book Award, the Man Booker Prize, and the PEN/Faulkner Award — between 2007 and 2011. To their surprise, while sales of the books that won awards skyrocketed following recognition, the online ratings of these same books plummeted.”

The article goes on to explain that this may be due to having a wider audience — people with more varied tastes in books — reading a book, simply due to the award it received, rather than due to it fitting their own interests.

That seems to make sense, and I’ve definitely experienced this myself. I’ve read books based on an award they won, rather than just being interested in them, and I rarely ended up actually enjoying them. Though I think I have often attributed it more to judges awarding books for being edgy or show, rather than actually good. ;)

I’m a little skeptical of the researchers only having looked at Goodreads, since I’ve seen variations between reviews there and on other book community or bookselling sites. They did mention that Goodreads users are fairly representative of fiction readers in general, but the researchers also weeded out the ratings without a comment, and extrapolated other data that wasn’t explicit, so that can skew things even more. So take that for what it is.

Article: Brain function “boosted for days after reading a novel”

Brain function “boosted for days after reading a novel”

“Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said.”

(From The Independent, December 28, 2013)